Dating fender musicmaster bass

Of course I tended to hurry more when they were there, and I would fumble more, too.” Another really interesting fact was that he recalled that the eyelet boards were loaded/wired/soldered in Mexico!“I remember the circuit boards were pre-made, from Mexico, easy to screw into the chassis. When we had filled our cart we'd wheel it over to the Chicano chicks.There is some debate about how to interpret the production code information on late ‘50s to mid-1967 tube charts and Greg Huntington is still working with those.One thing we know for sure is that production codes can help date an amp to a particular month within a given model run.Since the new owner would have likely removed this tag immediately upon arriving home, I’m amazed that the one in the photo has remained intact since mid-1968!Along with dating amps by serial numbers, we were interested in determining production totals, if possible. Oddlings – Yet another printing error has surfaced, this time from the FEI (pre-CBS) days.

The boss came around and said what we'd be building. Probably the same as the pots and transformers that we just dug out of the boxes.These are marked with EIA code “831” and are most prevalent during the 1966-68 time period.Some examples include a '66 Princeton Reverb and ’66 Pro Reverb with Better Coil output transformer, a ‘66 Deluxe Reverb and ‘67 Twin Reverb with Better Coil reverb transformer, and a 1968 Vibro Champ with Better Coil trannies.It’s unknown if the tweed covering was a mistake (“Oops, I thought this was a 4x10 Bassman cabinet that I was covering”) or intentional, perhaps as a special order.Non-Schumacher transformers – It’s been universally accepted that Fender only used Schumacher transformers on amps made in the 1960s and 1970s.

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